Inside Amy Schumer Review – Slut Shaming (S2E10)

Chad White, The Sluttiest Slut, Not Shamed

 

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The first sketch of “Slut Shaming” really speaks to me on two levels: 1. I’ve never had an established sexual relationship with a female friend where we can just hit each other up at any time and say “let’s bang” and 2. When the relationship was unspoken, I did put a lot of thought into how I looked. I would wear a decent button up shirt and spray myself with one spritz of my cologne (Adidas Fresh Impact has lasted me over two years now). I don’t have many moves so I would suggest to the girl that we get some ice cream, go for a walk and end up back at my place to watch a movie. And I have a lot of movies to choose from so….there you go ladies.

But usually, the night would be bookended with us hooking up in some capacity. Now I don’t really talk to girls all that much so this only with a handful of girls over the past few years. In this opening sketch, Amy receives that text that single people yearn to see. She stops what she is doing and immediately makes appointments to better herself. She gets her nails done, hair groomed and jumps through various hoops to appear as though she maintained her vivacious look from the last time her f-buddy was in town. But after dousing her body in perfume, cleaning her apartment of discarded liquor bottles, and practicing conversation, Schumer can’t bring herself to answer the door. That answers to her self-consciousness on a different plain as she looks good but she doesn’t feel good.

This sketch is one of the more eye opening ones as both men and women can attest to the fact of dwindling confidence no matter how much we think we’re ready for that thing we lust for. This need for another person but lacking in assurance of one’s self bleeds into the second sketch called “Who’s Most Over Their Ex.” Schumer and some guy compete in a game show to prove who is better at moving on with life after a difficult breakup. Games include who can have a conversation with a mutual friend and not ask about their ex and changing their online relationship status. This was way too real, especially if you can relate. It’s all funny because, while the characters are somewhat overly dramatic, anyone who has been in that situation knows that exact feeling of wanting that relationship back. It’s not the best sketch of the night but it is good based solely on truth.

Another sketch follows Schumer and her boyfriend who won’t admit that Channing Tatum is one hot guy. I mean just look at him. He’s a hunksicle. Schumer puts the boyfriend in extremely specific situations to get him to admit Tatum’s male beauty including a jail shower scene and fellatio under in the dead of night. A knock at the door is the only thing that can break up the argument. And some stuff happens that’s too funny to ruin. But Reggie Watts is there and things get sexy.

My favorite sketch of the night based on the name alone is a take on a female driven daytime talk show. Dubbed “The Gab,” four women including the enchanting Natasha Leggero and the beautiful Sasheer Zamata (SNL) discuss happenings in their lives. The only premise of the show mirrors any all-female conversation in which the women only discuss the happenings of one of their close friends. These ladies really hate some chick named Janelle. Just to fit in with the gang, I started to hate her too. Fuck Janelle.

But what does this all amount to in the end? Most sketches of the night were tied up in the theme of not being okay with one’s self. The boyfriend couldn’t admit that Channing Tatum is attractive without feeling gay; the exes couldn’t get over their past relationships because they invested too much of themselves into said relationship. These are two varying leaps with one (the latter) being much more serious than the other (the former). Amy Schumer is comfortable with herself. She speaks her mind, not caring about what people think of her. She may not be accepting of her body at all times or escape into talking about a friend in order to feel somewhat better than that person but she appreciates herself for what it’s worth. That’s what most of her comedy is about. “Slut-Shaming” did more than provide laughs. It also ended a great season on a thought provoking note.

Episode Grade: B+, Or 3 ½ Naked Channing Tatums